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  1.  Miao Ying, Love's Labor's Lost, 2019

     Miao Ying, Love's Labor's Lost, 2019

     Ye Funa, Beauty Plus Save the Real World, 2018

     Ye Funa, Beauty Plus Save the Real World, 2018

     Electromagnetic Brainology, 2018

     Electromagnetic Brainology, 2018

     Can You Tear For Me?,   2015 When is the last time you cried? (tear bottle for online exchange), 2018-2019

     Can You Tear For Me?,   2015

    When is the last time you cried? (tear bottle for online exchange), 2018-2019

     Miao Ying, Love's Labor's Lost, 2019

     Miao Ying, Love's Labor's Lost, 2019

     Ye Funa, Beauty Plus Save the Real World, 2018

     Ye Funa, Beauty Plus Save the Real World, 2018

     Electromagnetic Brainology, 2018

     Electromagnetic Brainology, 2018

     Can You Tear For Me?,   2015 When is the last time you cried? (tear bottle for online exchange), 2018-2019

     Can You Tear For Me?,   2015

    When is the last time you cried? (tear bottle for online exchange), 2018-2019

    • 1

       Miao Ying, Love's Labor's Lost, 2019

    • 2

       Ye Funa, Beauty Plus Save the Real World, 2018

    • 3

       Electromagnetic Brainology, 2018

    • 4

       Can You Tear For Me?,   2015

      When is the last time you cried? (tear bottle for online exchange), 2018-2019

    Chinternet Ugly

    CFCCA, 8 February - 11 May 2019

    Artists:  aaajiao, Lin Ke, Liu Xin, Lu Yang and Ye Funa, Miao Ying

    China is home to 802 million Internet users, 431 million micro-bloggers, 788 million Internet mobile phone users, and four of the top ten Internet companies in the world. This vast user base combined with a handful of ubiquitous online platforms and e-commerce giants including WeChat, Tencent and Alibaba results in cultural currents that flow at a blinding pace – spreading and evolving far more rapidly than on the ‘global’ web and creating a distinct internet culture – the ‘Chinternet’. Utilising this space as a site for cultural and political negotiation, critique and play, the artists presented in ‘Chinternet Ugly’ probe how
 the sheer volume of Internet users in China ensure that the country 
is effectively becoming its own online centre of gravity, one with the power to create its own sphere of influence over network norms.

    Focusing on a younger generation of artists – the first to have grown up with mass digital technology – ‘Chinternet Ugly’ invites the viewer to explore the complex and contradictory nature of China’s hyper-regulated digital sphere from the perspective of some of its most dynamic and engaging artists. From Xu Wenkai (aaajiao) and Lin Ke’s manipulations of found digital materials and standard software programs; to the augmented reality of Lu Yang; the celebratory pop aesthetics of Ye Funa to the dark side of internet freedom in the works of Liu Xin, and the veneration of the ugly and artless evident in the works of Miao Ying.